[video] Chess News #16: Naiditsch – Kramnik, Dortmund 2008

Update:

After watching back my video I would like to add an improvement.

It seems silly to deem white’s 19th move Qd2 as dubious, after all the ensuing endgame with queen versus two rooks is a draw most likely, so that is no worse for White than the line I gave after 19.Rf5. Somehow I thought that Black had chances with the two rooks against the queen – which remained a sticky thought in my mind – until I noticed that White can win the pawn on g7.

Also later today I learned that the move 19.Qd2 had already been discovered by Kasparov back in 1999! Apparently Kramnik was facing something really new and it remains to be revealed if he missed 22…Rc8(!) as pointed out in the video and that he felt forced to play 19…Ng6?, or that he underestimated White’s chances after 19…Ng6?

Anyway, here is the video.
Enjoy!

10 Comments

  1. transpositions July 2, 2008

    Waldemar,

    Once again interesting video.

    I watched this game as it was being played. Since there is a 15 min. delay after moves are made on the board, there is plenty of time to analyze. After 19.Qd2, I did some analyzing while waiting for the next move. I found that after 20.Qxe5 Qb4+ 21.Ke8 instead of 21.Re1 much better is 21.Qxb5+ and the many lines that follow seem to favor White in complications. I believe this is one of critical variations that Kramnik analyzed in his 45-50 minute think after Naiditsch’s 19.Qd2. The key feature,I’m sure very distasteful to Kramnik, is that his King would be in the middle of the board with no visible escape variation and all of White’s heavy pieces still on the board. Mr. Kramnik, more than likely began seeing ghosts and opted for what his analysis indicated was the safest line. As it turns out, later that evening I had a look at ICC.FM’s video analysis of the game. He also found the 21.Qxb5+ check line and did some over the board analysis in his video.
    Chessbase’s article mentions Kasparov’s home analysis, but does not mention the 21.Qxb5+ lines.

    Take a look at it http://webcast.chessclub.com/Dortmund08/Round3/GOTD.html

  2. RommyB July 2, 2008

    Very interesting and instructive !
    Thanks so much.

  3. Ragnar July 2, 2008

    Fairly weak analysis of the Qd2 Novelty — jumping to the dubious conclusion too quickly by only looking at 21.Re1

  4. Waldemar July 3, 2008

    Thanks guys.

    @ transpositions:

    Thanks very much for the added suggestion of 21.Qxb5+. I just looked at the GOTD video. That would explain well what Kramnik was trying to figure out and why he played 19…Ng6 in the end.

  5. Erik July 3, 2008

    Excellent commentated games… very instructive!!
    Thanks & keep up the good work!

  6. Marcel July 3, 2008

    ‘It seems silly to deem white’s 19th move Qd2 as dubious, after all the ensuing endgame with queen versus two rooks is a draw most likely, so that is no worse for White than the line I gave after 19.Rf5. Somehow I thought that Black had chances with the two rooks against the queen – which remained a sticky thought in my mind – until I noticed that White can win the pawn on g7.’

    But what if (in the variation you are refering to after 20. … – Qxe5) black doesn’t exchange his Queen on d2 immediately but plays Rc5, waiting for white to exchange his rook for the black Queen? White does not win the pawn on g7 and his rook is better placed.

  7. Waldemar July 3, 2008

    Hi Marcel,

    True, that is possible. I’m afraid however that after 26.Rxd5+ Rxd5 27.Qb3 Kd6 28.Qb4+ Black has nothing more constructive than to tuck away his king in the corner with …Kc7 allowing 29.Qc3+ Kb8 30.Qxg7= anyway.

  8. Marcel Heilig July 5, 2008

    Hi Waldemar,

    In todays Volkskrant Ligterink discusses the game. He gives part of your variation, considering the position a draw.
    Still in my humble opinion the King should not be tucked away in the corner. Black should play actively with his rooks and king (even at the cost of a pawn):
    (after 28.Qb4+)28. … – Ke6 29.Qc3 f6 30.Qe3+ Kf5 31. h3 Rhd8
    Which is a very active way of defending the position, even if it loses the pawn on a7…

    By the way: I am enyoing your site!

  9. openingtrap July 7, 2008

    Another russian openingtrap ;)

  10. Waldemar July 7, 2008

    Ha, true!

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