[video] Student Game Analysis #1: Counterattacking, Counterattacking, Counterattacking…

In this video I’m taking a look at a tournament game fragment that was played by Dolrish Aguillon who is one of my students. I decided to discuss this game because it heavily features one of the most important topics in chess: the counterattack!

The counterattack can be a great defensive weapon as we shall see in this game.
It allows a player to stand his ground rather then give it up and go along with the opponents’ “nudges”. From that point of view there is a lesson in this fragment for everybody!

As always, leave your comments below!
Enjoy the video.

Click on the moves below to start playing and show a diagram:

PGN notation:

[Event “Brasschaat Open”] [Site “Brasschaat, belgium”] [Date “2014.08.20”] [Round “4”] [White “Aguillon, Dolrish”] [Black “Sylvain Marmenout”] [Result “1-0″] [ECO “C70″] [WhiteElo “1575”] [BlackElo “1485”] [Annotator “Waldemar Moes, Better Your Chess”] [PlyCount “45”] [EventDate “2014.??.??”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Nxe4 6. Re1 (6. d4 b5 7. Bb3 d5
8. dxe5 Be6 $10) 6… d5 $2 (6… Nc5 $1 7. Bxc6 (7. Nxe5 $6 Nxe5 8. Rxe5+ Be7
9. Bb3 O-O) 7… dxc6 8. Nxe5 Be7 9. d4 Ne6 10. Be3) 7. Nxe5 $2 (7. d3 $6 b5 $1
8. dxe4 dxe4 $1 (8… bxa4 $4 9. exd5 Ne7 10. Nxe5 Qxd5 11. Qxd5 Nxd5 12. Ng6+)
9. Qxd8+ Nxd8 10. Rxe4 bxa4 11. Nxe5 Bf5 $10) (7. Bxc6+ $1 bxc6 8. d3 $1 Nf6 9.
Nxe5 Be6 10. Nxc6 $16) 7… Bd6 $1 8. Nxc6 $6 (8. Bxc6+ bxc6 9. d4 $10) 8…
Bxh2+ $1 (8… bxc6 $4 9. Bxc6+ Bd7 10. Bxd5 Bxh2+ 11. Kh1 Qh4 $2 12. Rxe4+ $18
) 9. Kf1 $2 (9. Kxh2 Qh4+ 10. Kg1 Qxf2+ 11. Kh2 Qh4+ $10) 9… Bd7 $4 (9… Qh4
$1 10. Qf3 (10. Rxe4+ dxe4 11. Na7+ b5 12. Nxc8 bxa4 $19) 10… O-O 11. Nd4 Be5
$15) 10. Nxd8 $18 Rxd8 11. Bxd7+ Rxd7 12. d3 Re7 13. dxe4 dxe4 14. g3 h5 15.
Nc3 h4 16. Rxe4 Rxe4 17. Nxe4 hxg3 18. fxg3 f5 19. Qf3 fxe4 20. Qxe4+ Kd8 21.
Kg2 Kc8 22. Bf4 Rh5 23. Qe8# 1-0

1 Comment

  1. Marco Pernechele October 4, 2014

    In this game there are signs of a ‘ sectorial ‘ preparation . White inexplicably – in my opinion- chose 1 ) e4 , a move players with this Elo rating today rarely use because it requires a wide knowledge of difficult openings full of tactical tricks .Probably he (she ?)
    thinks the Spanish – Ruy Lopez can be played with natural and spontaneous moves , but as the game showed , that’s not the case . On the other hand , Black knew a fine mini-combination, probably inspired by the Marshall gambit , but only the first move , then he didn’t know how to go on …His real error was the positionally bad d5, not the loss of the queen ,a mental black out, extremely unusual at this stage of the game. In my opinion both players should , at least provisorily and in tournaments , choose a more solid repertoire , unless they wish to learn the main open games of course !

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