[video] Vladja’s Chess Adventures #5: Moes – Simkin, Brno 2014

Last November I was in Brno the second city of the Czech Republic. I was visiting an old school friend of mine and also participated in a chess tournament. Unfortunately during the first few rounds I was ill and had to cancel a few rounds. I decided to rejoin the tournament in the 4th round and managed to score 5 points out of a total of 7 played games. The final game was the most memorable one and it is this one that I want to take a look at. I am playing white and my opponent is a veteran of Czech Chess, Alexander Simkin.

Click on the moves below to start playing and show a diagram:

PGN Notation:

[Event “Brno Open”] [Site “?”] [Date “2014.11.22”] [Round “?”] [White “Moes, Waldemar”] [Black “Simkin, Alexander”] [Result “1-0″] [ECO “B98″] [Annotator “Waldemar Moes, Better Your Chess”] [PlyCount “107”] [EventDate “2014.??.??”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4.
Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 e6 7. f4 Be7 8. Qf3 Qc7 9. O-O-O O-O 10. Bd3 $6 {In
this position with the queen’s knight not yet being commited to the d7
“Najdorf” square, Black can also attack the now unprotected N on d4.} (10. Qg3
Nbd7 (10… Nc6 $2 11. Nxc6 bxc6 12. e5 dxe5 13. fxe5 Nh5 14. Qh4 f6 15. exf6
Nxf6 16. Bd3) 11. Be2 (11. Bd3 b5 12. Rhe1 b4 13. Nd5 exd5 14. Nf5 Bd8 15. Nxg7
Kh8 (15… Kxg7 16. Bh6+ Kxh6 17. Qg5#) 16. exd5) 11… b5 12. Bf3 Bb7) 10…
Nc6 $1 {An equalizing move. White is now faced with a somewhat awkward choice:
to retreat the attacked N to b3 or to trade on c6 so as to not lose time but
strengthening Black’s center and opening the b-file for him.} ({Another option
would have been:} 10… h6 11. h4 $5 hxg5 $4 12. hxg5 {when Black cannot
survive the onslaught on the h-file, e.g.:} g6 13. Qh3 Nh5 14. g4 {etc.}) 11.
Nxc6 {I opted for the exchange thereby eliminating one of the defenders of e5
so as to have a threaten to play e4-e5 soon.} bxc6 (11… Qxc6 12. Qg3 $14) 12.
Qg3 $1 (12. e5 dxe5 13. Bxf6 Bxf6 14. Ne4 Be7) 12… Ne8 (12… e5 13. fxe5
dxe5 14. Rhf1 Nh5 15. Qh4 Bxg5+ 16. Qxg5 Nf4 $11) 13. e5 $5 Bxg5 $2 (13… f6
$1 14. exf6 (14. exd6 Bxd6 15. Qh3 (15. Bh4 Bxf4+) 15… h6 16. Bh4 Bxf4+) (14.
Qh3 g6 15. Bh6) 14… Nxf6 15. Ne4) 14. exd6 Bxf4+ (14… Nxd6 15. fxg5) 15.
Qxf4 Nxd6 16. Bxh7+ (16. Ne4 $2 Ne8 17. Nf6+ $2 gxf6 18. Qh6 f5 $19) 16… Kxh7
17. Rxd6 Kg8 {Here my opponent offered a draw which I wisely declined. I had
not played my “petit combinaison” for pacifistic reasons.} (17… Rb8) (17…
Rd8 18. Qh4+) 18. Rhd1 $16 (18. Ne4) 18… Bb7 $2 {After this understandable
but passive move, Black is lost. The point is that his pieces are now clogged
up.} ({It was imperative to bring a defender to the threatened king side.}
18… Rb8 19. Ne4 $6 Rb5 20. Nf6+ $2 gxf6 21. R1d3 Rg5 22. Rh3 {and it appears
that White has nothing more than a draw.}) 19. Ne4 $18 {Bringing in the final
piece and threatening Nf6+ with a winning attack.} Qa5 (19… f6 20. Nc5 {This
was my original intention.} (20. Qh4 $1 $18 Rf7 (20… Rad8 $2 21. Nxf6+ gxf6
22. Qg3+ Kf7 (22… Kh8 23. Qh3+ Kg8 24. Qg4+ Kh8 25. Qh5+ Kg8 26. Qg6+ Kh8 27.
Rxd8 Rxd8 28. Qxf6+) 23. Rxd8 Qxg3 24. hxg3 $18) 21. R1d3 {with a winning
attack.})) 20. Nf6+ $1 {I took a ong time before playing this, because I am
sacrificing a piece and had to consider several defenses.} (20. R6d3 $1 {
Change the move order.}) 20… gxf6 (20… Kh8 $2 21. Qh4+ Qh5 22. Qxh5#) 21.
R6d3 $1 (21. R1d3 Qe1+ 22. Rd1 Qe5) 21… Rfd8 {Black’s only hope is to make
room for his king.} (21… Rfe8 22. Qxf6 Qxa2 (22… Kh7) 23. Qg5+ (23. Ra3 Qc4
24. Rh3) 23… Kf8 24. Qh6+ Ke7 25. Rd7#) (21… Qg5 22. Rg3) {Now comes the
star move of the game really, can you find what I played? Pause the video if
you like, I will count to three and then we will compare answers.} 22. b4 $1 {
Play is completely forced now.} (22. Qxf6 Rxd3) (22. Qh6 Rxd3) 22… Qb6 (22…
Qg5 23. Qxg5+ fxg5 24. Rxd8+) (22… Qc7 23. Qxc7) 23. Qh6 Rxd3 (23… Rd5 24.
Rg3+ Rg5 25. Rh3 {and wins.}) 24. Rxd3 Qg1+ 25. Kb2 Qxg2 {Black can barely
stop the mate, but in order to do so, he loses his queen.} 26. Rg3+ Qxg3 27.
hxg3 f5 {OK, the storm has blown over and we have reached an end game, let’s
take stock. What is White’s winning plan going to be? In order to find out, we
first have to find the imbalances of the position.} 28. Qe3 (28. Qd2 $1 {was
also good.}) ({I also analyzed the other plan} 28. Kc3 $6 c5 29. bxc5 Rc8 30.
Kd4 e5+ 31. Kxe5 Rxc5+ {But did not think that this was convincing.} 32. Kf6
Rc6+) 28… Re8 {The position plays difficult for Black.} 29. Qb6 {Here my
opponent was visually annoyed since he had intended to play Re7?} Bc8 (29…
Re7 30. Qd8+) 30. Qxc6 Kf8 31. Kc1 e5 32. Kd2 e4 $6 33. Ke3 Ke7 34. a4 Rg8 35.
Qc7+ Ke6 36. b5 axb5 37. axb5 Bd7 38. Qc4+ (38. Kd4) 38… Ke7 39. Qc5+ Ke6 40.
Kd4 $1 {Threatening mate.} Bc8 (40… f6 41. Qc4+) 41. Qe5+ Kd7 42. Qxf5+ Kd8
43. Qf6+ Ke8 44. Qc6+ Kd8 (44… Bd7 45. Qa8+) 45. b6 (45. Qd6+ Ke8 46. Qc7)
45… Ke7 46. Qc7+ Kf6 47. b7 Bxb7 48. Qxb7 Rxg3 49. Qxe4 Kg5 50. Qe7+ f6 51.
Qg7+ Kh4 52. Qxf6+ Kh5 53. Qe5+ Rg5 54. c4 1-0

2 Comments

  1. Ashley Krishnasing February 5, 2015

    Splendid game Waldemar. It looks like 22.b2-b4! was the winning idea. How much time did U spent to find the move? After that, there was still some work to do, but I think U did it in a very good technical and instructive way. Congrats with the nice result!

  2. Author
    Waldemar February 6, 2015

    Hi Ashley,

    Thanks for your compliments.
    I seem to remember thinking about 20.Nf6! for about 25 min.
    I had to consider different defenses and had to foresee everything from that moment on of course, since sacrificing a knight means being down a piece ;-)

    Yes, the technical phase with bringing in the king to e3 and d4 etc. was pleasing.

    Cheers,
    Waldemar

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